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Current Questions
Thank you for visiting our site. If you have a question (or six) that you would like add to our list of frequently asked questions enter it below.

1. What styles do you teach?
2. What is the point of teaching so many styles?
3. Do you teach a mixed style of martial arts? With a little of this and a little of that?
4. Do you teach an integrated style?
5. How can you possibly teach so many different styles?
6. Doesn't it take an awful long time to master a style? How can more styles be taught without radically increasing the amount of time necessary to learn?
7. How long does it take in your school to get to a black belt?
8. How can you possibly do it so quickly?
9. What is the difference between the traditional styles of martial arts and your style?
10. Isn't it better to learn a traditional style?
11. Why go to your school over someone else's school?
12. How often can I come to classes?
13. Is it necessary to learn all those diffferent styles?
14. Can I just learn one or two?
15. How long are the classes?
16. Will my friends and family members get a discount if they come in with me?
17. Is it okay to watch classes?
18. Do you spar or grapple in training?
19. What about testing and rank?
20. Is there an organized approach?
21. How do people progress?
22. Is your training just physical?

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1. What styles do you teach?
We teach Karate, Jiu-Jitsu, Judo, Aikido, Kempo, Muay Thai Kickboxing, Shaolin Kung Fu and Tai Chi Chuan.
2. What is the point of teaching so many styles?
We hope that people can be as effective as possible in self-defense, and we are happy to use any tools that are useful in doing this. Each style has its own strengths and weaknesses. By training in several, a student can gradually come to see the advantages and disadvantages of each method. For example, people that only know how to strike at an opponent may find it very difficult to defend themselves if they are forced into a grappling situation. The reverse is also true for someone who is only skilled in a style of grappling. Therefore, in order to learn one style and be able to apply it well, it is very useful to be versed in other styles. A student studying at ISDC will become expert in many different styles thus becoming more effective in what is our primary purpose - self-defense.
3. Do you teach a mixed style of martial arts? With a little of this and a little of that?
We do not have a style which is a mixture of incomplete elements from different martial arts. We teach the martial arts in their complete form.
4. Do you teach an integrated style?
We teach many styles. In training we also integrate them, so a student faced with one style of attack has many options. He or she can use the style of the attacker or choose another style to win. The student can rely on a specific style or is able to use many martial arts as one.
5. How can you possibly teach so many different styles?
We have been qualified to teach many different methods of martial arts and fighting techniques. The instructors at ISDC train and teach the martial arts full time. They have done this for more than ten years in the same location. A high level of skill has been developed by many of the students at the school and gives a very good atmosphere for training. If you would like to see how we teach, visit a class, watch, and/or participate.

6. Doesn't it take an awful long time to master a style? How can more styles be taught without radically increasing the amount of time necessary to learn?

If a person goes to a school that only teaches one style, it will take them a number of years to master the style taught at that school. After that, generally it would be necessary to go another school in order to learn another style and again it would take a number of years of study. Additionally, attempting to study at more than one school without an instructor's guidance can be very confusing.

However, the training at ISDC brings the styles together in one place. The curriculum is designed to make it possible for the martial arts to be learned in their complete form and integrated seamlessly.

7. How long does it take in your school to get to a black belt?
A black belt in our school will be able to show a high level of technical ability and fighting skill in the various martial arts we teach. Generally for adults it takes about four to eight years. However, every student moves at their own rate, so it could take longer and it might be accomplished sooner. Belt ranks are a way of marking students' progress in training. Black belt is not the end of training but it is a significant milestone.
8. How can you possibly do it so quickly?
In training, demands increase in relation to the student's level of ability. As the student trains, his or her abilities increase. One of these abilities is the ability to learn and make progress. The training is progressively more demanding, physically and technically. Additionally, the training in one style compliments the development of skill, indurance, flexibility, timing, etc. of the next style and so on.
10. What is the difference between the traditional styles of martial arts and your style?
We teach "traditional" martial arts; our emphasis is on self-defense and improving charactor through practice. We do not see tradition as more important than effictiveness. This is in accordance with the origins of martial arts, which were designed both as practical methods of protection and means of self-improvement. However, in time martial arts have become increasingly specialized and narrow in their focus. In some cases this has led to the loss of martial arts' original intent. What we do is both a realistic self-defense method and an art, rather than one or the other. We see this as in keeping with the original purpose of martial arts.
11. Isn't it better to learn a traditional style?
"Often traditional implies that a style is rigid; unchanging." This means it is not open to new ideas or improvements and is necessarily limited. A person who wants to be able to defend himself or herself should consider if "traditional" martial arts, in this sense of the word, are realistic.
12. Why go to your school over someone else's school?

Top five reasons:

  • We have the best drinking water in town.
  • We charge a lot.
  • We make great punch.
  • We wear the coolest outfits.
  • You can not get the ISDC super spy decoder ring anywhere else.

The next top five reasons:

  • The environment.
  • The people.
  • The teachers.
  • The curriculum.
  • The ISDC super spy decoder ring.
13. How often can I come to classes? 
As often as you like. We have quite a few classes. Usually about three (open to beginners) during the average day. Additionally, students can train with partners or on their own when we are open. When a student reaches the intermediate and advanced student levels there are more classes available. In order to get a class schedule, contact the school.
14. Is it necessary to learn all those diffferent styles?
Yes, but it depends on you. Do you want to learn less? We teach self-defense and specific martial arts. Our styles are highly developed individually to cope with and defend against other methods. In order to learn an individual style at ISDC, it is necessary, to learn the other styles we teach. This is because what we teach is unique and we do not want to compromise its effectiveness.
15. Can I just learn one or two?
Students have a certain amount of freedom, especially as they increase in rank to focus on their interest. Teachers assist and guide them in the process of discovering and understanding the techniques of the martial arts. If a student desires to learn from us techniques of a particular style then they must fulfil the necessary requirements. If you are interested in pursuing studies at the center and wish to focus on a particular style, please mention it to us as you interview to become a student.
16. How long are the classes?
Generally classes last one hour. Most classes include a vigorous warmup, exercise and stretching routine. The day to day practices in the class vary according to the students present.
17. Will my friends and family members get a discount if they come in with me?
Yes. Members on the same account receive a substantial discount. Please inquire for more information.
18. Is it okay to watch classes?
Yes. Prospective students are encouraged to inform themselves about the school by watching classes and asking questions. We also encourage anyone who is interested to try out the class for themselves. This is a good way to become more familiar with the school and allows the prospective student to see what it is like to be in our classes.
19. Do you spar or grapple in training?
Yes, at a level appropriate for the student's abilities. Safety is one of our principle concerns since we are teaching self-defense. Sparring or grappling without concern for safety would not facilitate the development of a student's ability to defend himself or herself. Gradually, as the students abilities increase, sparring becomes more "intense" but for the student, the level is still within their abilities. We do not want students wildly making contact as this would lead to injuries. Advanced ranks can spar or grapple at a high level without injuring each other.
20. What about testing and rank?
Students show their progress in our school by the color of the belt they wear. Each belt color is a step toward the goal of becoming a black belt. There are ten degrees of black belt. Tests are held on a monthly basis. If the student has mastered the material for his rank and all prior material, he or she is eligible to test and will be notified by the instructors.
21. Is there an organized approach?
Proceeding up the ranks from white to black belt introduces increasingly complex materials. The curriculum is designed to bring the student along, introducing material that evolves into the different martial arts styles and approaches. The sophistication of material increases, yet keeps pace within the physical means of the student. It is also presented in a manner that allows the student to be ready for it's acceptance, not only physically, but also mentally so that the student does not learn material which could cause significant harm and be used inappropriately. When the student is ready, the material is provided. The method that we teach is not a mishmash, styles are taught in a progression. Integration, overlap, and a certain amount of repetition allow for the material to deeply sink in and become "part of the fabric of one's being". This is not a one-time technique one learns and then forgets, but becomes part of the person.
22. How do people progress?
Everyone proceeds at his or her own pace. Although there's a general timeline relating to the progression through the ranks, it all depends on a person's dedication, perseverance, skill, and attitude. All paths lead to the same place, each may take a different road. People are different; some people are tall, others are short, some people are out-of shape, others are very muscular. Some people have a natural disposition towards grappling, others may have good kicks. It is an instructor's task to take an individual, whatever their strengths and weaknesses, and make them complete, well-rounded martial artists. One of the aspects of this is how that individual fights. That is why teach such a complete method.
23. Is your training just physical?
As one progresses through the ranks, one becomes increasingly aware of the interior aspects of martial arts. This allows the student to become more powerful in the practice of their art, both in a physical and mental sense. As the interior part opens up, new possibilities are realized, which have interesting carry over effects in many parts of a student's life. If you would like more information, come in and participate.
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